Fox-Orian’s Digital Artist Workstation On-A-Sorta-Budget Guide - $450 to $650!

fox-orian:

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Doing digital art requires computer hardware to do it. And you can honestly start doing digital work on any computer you already own, whether it be an over-the-counter desktop or laptop, even over 5 years old!

But, if you’re getting more serious about digital art and you want a dedicated workstation to do it with hardware that’s more effective for its cost, you’re going to want to build your own computer. Laptops are great for their portability and being an easy purchase, but that’s about all they have going for them. A budget desktop system has price-to-performance ratios that completely destroy laptops and can save you money over time from needing to upgrade less often and only needing to swap out individual parts instead of the whole machine.

Are you in the market for this sort of thing right now? This is a lengthy article, so read all about it by continuing on!

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fox-orian:

creativesauce:

A perspective lesson in Photoshop, I draw sci-fi environments

Check out this perspective walk through on these awesome drawings by Tyler!

Bonus at the end, I give you a tutorial on how to make pen-path grids in Photoshop that you can stretch around to your hearts content for perspective!

fox-orian:

As with the last photo collection, here’s another look into the color correction process I do to my images. The left column (or first photo of each pair) is the original photo untouched as it was taken from my camera. The right column (or second photo) is the finalized edit done with Adobe Camera Raw / LightRoom.

I answered a question on DA regarding some details on the color correction I perform:
"These are all RAW photos, meaning I can pull an insane amount more detail out of every facet of them than traditional JPEG’s. I shift around all sliders of these photos to somewhat extremes. One of the biggest tricks is that every one of these photos has their contrast slider turned all the way down to the lowest (or near the lowest.) This increases dynamic range and makes higher contrast elements such as the sky and the ground closer together. Increasing the blue-channel saturation makes the sky more vivid and deeper, as opposed to lighter / overexposed. Next, I separate the Red, Blue, and Green channels in hue to make all of the colors in the photo very differentiated. Colors get pushed to further primaries (all elements in the photos become more starkly red, green, or blue.) And lastly, to re-introduce a bit of harmony, I warm the scene up in temperature and make the tint a tad magenta."

For details about why I do what I do to my photography, refer to this prior explanation.

@ndgo: Reality does have this much life and character! The problem is that cameras capture this reality at a very flat face-value representation. Through color correction, I try to bring the life that I experienced there in person back into the photos. I’m not making the photos look better than real life, I’m just trying to make them look LIKE it (or how I see it, anyway.)

fredericstewart:

Korra Book 3 finale is online right now!   These are some backgrounds from this season and some comps from the finale.  I did the paint. layout was most likely either Angela Sung or William Niu.

So, I've been looking through your tutorials, specifically the one on skin. I think it's great- it's really good and explains stuff really well (all your tutorials do :) ),but I was having some trouble understanding undertones. How do you identify somebody's undertones? I get it in the general sense, but how can you tell that it will be this shade of a color vs another shade? Thanks so much, you're a huge inspiration and your artwork gets better each time! -anna

Anonymous

peaceofseoul:

Hi! I’m glad the tutorials are helpful!

So, at first glance, its not hard to estimate an undertoneBut it also really helps to use the colour picker  in the most saturated parts of the face (Neither in light or shadow) 

Especially in pictures like these try to avoid the contour area just around the outside edges of the apples of the cheeks incase the model is wearing a lot of blush. Any natural makeup such as foundation or bronzer is fine because it should match the natural colours of the face, unlike blush which is usually a different colour.

These are the colours I picked from the faces. (you can also just eyeball them)

You can use these as your base tones when you paint, but knowing the actual undertone can give the skin a more unified and continuous look. So take the colour you took from the photo and use the full colour adjuster/ picker thing to find the undertone (again, you can just eyeball it unless you want to be super precise).

Some of the colours you find may seem really different from the original image, that’s okay! The colour should represent the mood or the essence of the face, the undertone can be any colour imaginable and one person can have more than one undertone depending on the lighting or the mood you want the piece to have. Giving someone a green or blue undertone can make them look sick. Giving someone a orange or red undertone can make them look warm and inviting. Its up to you! Just having an undertone in your art can make a piece look more realistic and give your art a larger range of skin tones.

Once you do this enough times it becomes a lot easier to eyeball the undertones and make them up for original drawings and characters. Do whatever feels right!

I hope this helps!

LADIES AND GENTLEMEN

summoner-rena:

IF YOU ARE STREAMING, DON’T USE PROCASTER.

DON’T. USE. PROCASTER.

Livestream procaster consumes large amounts of cpu for nothing. No joke, nothing. As a result your stream can become laggy and sometimes it can damage your hardware as your PC has to push itself to keep what your streaming functioning as well as possible.

"But if we can’t use procaster what can we use insteaaaaad?"

Simple. There’s two programs, both that are free, that you can use that uses very little CPU and has more options than procaster. These programs are called Xsplit and OBS. To keep your head in one piece, I’m going to go over how to stream on Livestream with Xsplit.

Under the cut of course.

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turnonred:

Okay that took forever, I’m sorry. Here’s the tutorial on how I made my Journey costume! I’ve included a photoset of the tutorial, and below are the links that will take you to the pattern PDFs (the first is a 24 x 36 file, so happy print tiling!). For Illustrator-savvy folks, you can also dive into the pattern files and manipulate them yourselves.

Side note: I am not a professional seamstress/fashion designer, so I’m sorry if there’s inaccuracies or errors or dubious advice, it’s more of a step by step of how I did it with helpful patterns!

Any questions, use the Ask box, also! I’m happy to offer any help or advice! And I’m sorry, but I do not take commissions!

Pattern File
Glyph File

If you have problems downloading, let me know! Don’t abuse my bandwidth, plz

EDIT: A lot of people have been having sizing troubles with the hood lately, not sure if it’s just the new file I uploaded or not because I can’t pinpoint why. So everyone MAKE SURE to test it on paper then scrap fabric FIRST before you cut into the fabric you are using!